FEELING STRESSED

TEACHING V-8 MOMENTS

BEHAVIOR 101

Parent Communication: Tuesday Teacher Tips


This week's tip is a two-fer.  It is a parent communication tip and a sponge activity all bundled together.

Have you read Stephen Covey's book?

(Click on book to read more about it.)

Covey talks about an emotional bank account (EBA).  This is a metaphor for the trust in a relationship.  You can make deposits or withdrawls in this account.  Relationships work like a bank account.  You can build trust or tear down (withdrawl) trust.

Relationships are an important part of a teacher's job.  We have relationships with our boss, co-workers, students, and students' parents.  When the new year begins, teachers, students, and parents feel anxious.  One of the best ways I have found to  deal with anxiety is to make deposits in my students' EBA. By doing this, I am letting my students and parents know that I see the positive in my students. You can do this by making a positive phone call or sending home a happy note.


One year, I had a class that was going through a particularly irritable phase.  It seemed like they spent more of their time tattling than working on their classwork.  I wanted them to focus on the positive things about their classmates so I began an activity called "nominations".  When we had an extra 5-10 minutes before lunch or at the end of the day, I would announce that it was time for nominations.  Students could nominate a classmate for a happy note.  The student had to give a specific reason or example of why his or her classmate was nominated.  I kept track of who had been nominated so it wasn't the same students getting a happy note every day.   Nominations improved the climate of our class, worked as a sponge activity, and built a positive relationship with my students and parents.

I have free happy notes for you.  Click HERE to download it.



Looking for more tips?  Check out my Classroom Management Pinterest board.  Click on the picture below.


Fern has a few tips to share with you, too.  Be sure to hop over to her blog!




Fern and I are adding something new this summer.  Summer is a great time to catch up on your reading.  I love to read teacher blogs and the latest teacher idea books.  Stop by Fern's blog and my blog each week for Tuesday Teacher Tips.  We hope you will share your ideas, too.  

Each week we will choose one person who shared a tip on our blog who will get a $10 shopping trip.  We will announce the winner in the following Tuesday's post.  The winner for June 3rd post will be announced on June 10th's post.

Do you have a parent communication tip to share?  Be sure to include your email so I can contact you if you're the winner of the $10 shopping trip.


Looking for more ideas?  Check out these!

5 comments

Fern Smith said...

I love the free happy notes, thank you!
~Fern

Deb Weaver said...

I was told many years ago by someone that I admired that when you speak to parents you always use the "Oreo" cookie method. You say something nice about the child (cookie part), say what you need to say nicely about any problems or things that need to be worked on (filling), and then say something nice again (cookie part). If you do that, parents will be left with something nice about their child. I have gone by this and it has worked for me. 57teachweaver32@gmail.com

KLowery said...

I love this idea, what a great way to have students recognize the positive in each other. My mentor when I was student teacher gave me a really neat idea that I have continued and love. I place “super kid cones” which I purchased at the Dollar Store on their desks. These are miniature traffic cones, and they don’t take up much room at all. I write their name on it with a marker. During the year, it sits on their desk as a visual reminder to follow directions and have good behavior. They “loose” their super kid cone as a first warning before any making any color changes for bad behavior. It’s like one extra chance. At the end of the day, anyone who still has their “super kid cone” gets a sticker or small treat as they leave for the day. This way those who I have not had to speak to all day get rewarded and recognized. Sometimes as a surprise, I may give a little extra special prize (like a ball or candy) to boost good behavior because they never know what they will miss. They HATE to lose their super kid cone, but of course it is always on their desk the very next day. At the end of the year, I tell them it is theirs to keep because I of course, I think they are all super kids! Jlowery@henry.k12.va.us

KLowery said...

I love this idea, what a great way to have students recognize the positive in each other. My mentor when I was student teacher gave me a really neat idea that I have continued and love. I place “super kid cones” which I purchased at the Dollar Store on their desks. These are miniature traffic cones, and they don’t take up much room at all. I write their name on it with a marker. During the year, it sits on their desk as a visual reminder to follow directions and have good behavior. They “loose” their super kid cone as a first warning before any making any color changes for bad behavior. It’s like one extra chance. At the end of the day, anyone who still has their “super kid cone” gets a sticker or small treat as they leave for the day. This way those who I have not had to speak to all day get rewarded and recognized. Sometimes as a surprise, I may give a little extra special prize (like a ball or candy) to boost good behavior because they never know what they will miss. They HATE to lose their super kid cone, but of course it is always on their desk the very next day. At the end of the year, I tell them it is theirs to keep because I of course, I think they are all super kids! Jlowery@henry.k12.va.us

KLowery said...

I love this idea, what a great way to have students recognize the positive in each other. My mentor when I was student teacher gave me a really neat idea that I have continued and love. I place “super kid cones” which I purchased at the Dollar Store on their desks. These are miniature traffic cones, and they don’t take up much room at all. I write their name on it with a marker. During the year, it sits on their desk as a visual reminder to follow directions and have good behavior. They “loose” their super kid cone as a first warning before any making any color changes for bad behavior. It’s like one extra chance. At the end of the day, anyone who still has their “super kid cone” gets a sticker or small treat as they leave for the day. This way those who I have not had to speak to all day get rewarded and recognized. Sometimes as a surprise, I may give a little extra special prize (like a ball or candy) to boost good behavior because they never know what they will miss. They HATE to lose their super kid cone, but of course it is always on their desk the very next day. At the end of the year, I tell them it is theirs to keep because I of course, I think they are all super kids! Jlowery@henry.k12.va.us