Summary Station



Today is the 2nd anniversary of my blog.  I was reflecting over this past year.  I reread my post from last year's anniversary.  Maybe it is the teacher in me or maybe it's the 20 years of crunching Dibels, BOY scores, and all the other numbers we look at as teachers, but I decided to look at my journey as a blogger this past year.  

*I wrote 204 blog posts.
*I had 2.5 million blog page views.

When I first began this journey I knew a little about computers but had no social media experience.  Then I joined Facebook December 2011 so I could join Pinterest.  After two years I am feeling comfortable with Facebook and Pinterest so I am ready to conquer my fear of Twitter.  I joined Twitter a few months ago but I haven't done very much with it.  My problem with Twitter is I am limited to 140 characters or less.  UGH!  I have so much to say and so little space to say it in! 

Then I had one of those lightning strikes moments.  This would be a good skill for students to practice.  I made 3 forms that have 140 spaces.  Each page has a different size of box so you can differentiate.




After you read a story to your class, pass out one of the forms.  There are 3 different ones to choose from so you can differentiate.  Ask your students to summarize what you read.


Use the forms to set up a summary station.  Students read an assigned chapter/book and then write a summary of their assignment on one of the forms.



These forms can be a response form when your students listen to a story online.  I wrote a post that has several free online sites.


Click HERE to read this post.



Click HERE to download the forms.



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Reading group idea and a prize



I was at my home away from home today . . . 


Can you relate?  Of course, the first place I head to is the dollar spot.  I have to see if they have added anything new that I might need since the last time I was at Target.  Today there were witches fingers.  I love to stock up on these because they are the perfect teaching tool.  There is something magical about them.  When a student slips them on their finger, they suddenly begin to track their words better.  

I also like to stock up on werewolf fingers, too.  Target doesn't carry them but the Halloween Spirit store does.  I call them wolf fingers and use them with my fairy tale units.  
Click HERE to read more.



Today I also got a nice surprise.  Jen @ The Teacher's Cauldron emailed me a picture of one of my Sentence Shuffle packet being used in her class today.  I love to see my lessons in action!


She was nice enough to give me permission to share the picture with you.  I love how she organized it into a file folder game.

Click HERE to visit my TPT store.


Are you looking for some new ideas to use with your reading groups?  Jen wrote a blog post that has a TON of fun ideas.  Go check it out!  


I am going to give away one of these packet on Friday.  To enter, leave a comment below telling me your favorite kind of Halloween candy and your email address.






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Halloween - interactive journal, task cards, and more!



Have you jumped on the interactive notebook or foldable bandwagon yet?  I love them!  They are a great way to add a hands-on approach to your lessons.  These printables remind me of the lift and learn books that students enjoy.  Have you seen this lift and learn book yet?



I included an index so you can find what you need easily.
Hints are given for your interactive journals.  Let me know if you have any tips to pass along.  If you don't use interactive journals, you can also glue these printables to construction paper or notebook paper.


All in the family printables are word family activities.  These -at and -ade word families assignments will enrich the book, Bats on Parade.


These vocabulary printables are open-ended.  Your students can write the definitions, use the words in a sentence, or write the part of speech of the words.

Students will compare to the Bat's parade to the Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade after they listen to the story.


There are beginning/middle/end printables for each book included with this packet.


Students will write sentences after listening to the story, The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything.


Task card hints are included.  Let me know if you have some tips to pass along.


Students will work on prefixes and suffixes with the Haunted Words task cards.


Students will work on plural nouns with the Spellbound task cards.

 
Steal and slide is a great way introduce valuable test taking skills.  There are Steal & Slide reading comprehension signs and worksheets for The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything. This also works great with your students who rush through their work.  I wrote about this method earlier.  Go check out these posts:

Click HERE to read this post.  There is a freebie for you.

Click HERE to read this post.  There is a freebie for you.



There are Steal & Slide reading comprehension signs and worksheets for The Night Before Halloween.


Click HERE to visit my TPT store.


Don't forget to check out my Spider packet that is in this format!


Click HERE to visit my TPT store.

I also have a Bat packet that is in this format!

Click HERE to visit my TPT store.



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Columbus Day


Columbus Day is just around the corner!  I just updated my Columbus Day Sentence Shuffle Center packet and added a Columbus Sentence Shuffle Trio packet to my store.  The trio packet has the Sentence Shuffle center PLUS it includes printables for interactive journals and a mini book.


The Sentence Shuffle Center includes a sign with a white background that is ink friendly.  This center is aligned with Common Core Standards.


Instruction sign is included so students won't interrupt your small group lesson when they forget the instructions.  On the right (above) is the page that students stack their word cards on.  There is a colorful and black and white version.

Above are the word cards.  Students match one card from each color to make a sentence.  Sentences can be real or nonsense. There is a colorful and black white version of these cards.

There is a writing extension assignment.  There are 3 different forms to choose from so you can differentiate the assignment.

This mini book can be used with your reading groups or sent home as a take home reader.

There are 3 interactive notebook printables included.  Students will make real and nonsense words in the -ail family on the "All in the Family" printable.  Students can use the beginning/middle/end printable with any Columbus Day book.  The vocabulary printable is open-ended.  You can have students write definitions, use the word in a sentence, or parts of speech.  


Click HERE to visit my TPT store.








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Selective Mutism Tips

Through the years I have had a few students with selective mutism. When I met my first student with S.M., I thought she was just very shy. For this post, I will call her Sally but that is not her real name. But, after a couple of weeks of school, it was clear that there was more going on that a case of shyness. That is when I asked for a meeting with Sally's parents to get their insight into what was happening. Her parents told me that she would only talk to the people in her immediate family and one neighbor. She wouldn't even speak to her grandparents or cousins. After observations and meetings with her pediatrician, counselor, speech pathologist, she was officially diagnosed as having selective mutism.
Luckily, Sally's parents were very open to ideas and happy to try anything that we suggested. Sally's mom would send me something to school on a weekly basis. Sometimes it was a bag of cookies that Sally and her mom had baked together. Other times Sally's mom let her pick out a packet of stickers to donate to our class. Sally's job was to hand the item(s) to me. We set the following goals:

1st: Hand the item to the teacher without mom standing beside her. I said thank you but did not ask her any questions about the item.

2nd: Hand the item to the teacher while looking at the teacher. I said thank you but did not ask her any questions about the item.

3rd: Hand the item to the teacher and say you're welcome. I said thank you but did not ask her any questions about the item.

4th: Hand the item to the teacher while looking at the teacher and say you're welcome. I said thank you but did not ask her any questions about the item.

5th: Hand the item to the teacher while looking at the teacher and say you're welcome. Answer teacher's question with one word. I said thank you and then asked her a question that could be answered with one word - usually a yes/no question.

6th: Hand the item to the teacher while looking at the teacher and say you're welcome. Answer teacher's question with 2 or more words. I said thank you and then asked her a question that required a few more details.
Once again, Sally's parents provided extra support to help her build relationships with her classmates. Sally and her mom loved to bake. Usually students only brought treats for their birthday. I gave her mom permission to send in treats more frequently. When Sally passed out the treats to her classmates, she was concentrating on the actual process of passing out, and less about her anxiety about communicating with her classmates. We set goals for this too.

1st: Pass out treats without teacher support.

2nd: Pass out treat and make eye contact with classmates.

3rd: Pass out treat, make eye contact with classmates, and smile when student says thank you.

4th: Pass out treat, make eye contact with classmates, and say you're welcome when classmate says thank you.
Sally received weekly support from our school counselor. Our counselor let Sally choose a buddy come with her. She and the buddy played games in the counselor's office. In the beginning, Sally would only smile and shake her head for yes or no. But, over time she slowly began to whisper to the counselor and her buddy. I think it helped that there was only one buddy and they were in a quiet office so she felt more comfortable. By the end of the year, she was able to invite 3 buddies to go with her. As you can imagine she became very popular because she got to pick her buddy(ies). Word quickly spread that if Sally chose you, you got to go play games. Students wanted to sit by her at lunch and invited her to play games with them at recess.
There are different reasons why a student may have S.M. Sometimes it is an anxiety issue. Click HERE to read more about this topic.


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